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  • Demetri Besougloff

Blog #9: Let's take another giant step and build some chords.

Updated: Dec 23, 2022

For information about private lessons and questions, please visit me at Demetri4.com.

Here is the YouTube link to the video that goes with this blog: http://bit.ly/3FF6Xli

Blog #9

Harmony-Primary Chords

Objectives:

  1. Identify primary chords in the Major key.

  2. Understand how to build primary chords.

Today, we will look at Natural Harmony using the Roman Numeral Circle page in your workbook. On the page, we see Roman numerals inside a large circle and a small circle in the upper right corner with the natural notes.

Essential Elements:

  • Chord: A group of three or more different notes.

  • Simple chord (triad): Consists of three notes - the root, the third, and the fifth.

  • Natural notes: are notes with no sharps or flats.

  • Interval: The distance between two notes measuring from lower to higher.

  • Music: Consists of three parts (melody, harmony, and rhythm).

  • Melody: The part of music that is above the chords and rhythm. The sing-along part.

  • Harmony: What supports and accompanies the melody.

  • Rhythm: The time aspect of music.

  • Natural harmony: Chords that use only the notes in the scale.

  • Primary chords: The chords on the first (I), fourth (IV), and fifth (V) scale degrees of the Major scale.

  • Scale degree: The numbering of the notes in a scale starting with the keynote as the Roman numeral "I."

  • Keynote: The note that names the key.

  • Root: The name of the chord.

  • Third: The third interval above the root.

  • Fifth: The fifth interval above the root.



Build the C major scale: Write on your Roman Numeral circle here.

First, place the letter C next to the uppercase Roman numeral "I" at 10:00. Next, place the letter D at "ii."

  • E at "iii"

  • F at "IV"

  • G at "V"

  • A at "vi"

  • and B at "vii."

The key of C:

Primary chords in C are --C (I), F (IV), and G (V).

The "I" chord (C):

The most basic chord form is a triad (three notes). It consists of the root, the third, and the fifth. For example, the root of the "I" chord is the note C (10:00). To find the other notes in the chord, we use a ternary system (taking every other note). Start with note C (I), skip (ii), take E (iii), skip (IV), and take G (V).

  • The C chord consists of only three notes: C (root), E (3rd), and G (5th).

  • In the "I" chord: the root is "I," the third is "iii," and the fifth is "V."

The "IV" chord (F):

The root of the "IV" chord is the note F (3:00). To find the other notes in the chord, start with F (IV), skip (V), take A (vi), skip (vii), and take C (I).

  • The F chord consists of only three notes: F (root), A (3rd), and C (5th).

  • In the "IV" chord: the root is "IV," the third is "vi," and the fifth is "I."

The "V" chord (G):

The root of the "V" chord is the note G (5:00). To find the other notes in the chord, start with G (V), skip (vi), take B (vii), skip (I), and take D (ii).

  • The G chord consists of only three notes: G (root), B (3rd), and D (5th).

  • In the "V" chord: the root is "V," the third is "vii," and the fifth is "ii."

Suppose you have worked on blogs #5 and #6 and have built major scales for the keys of G, F, and others. Next, build the "I," "IV," and "V" chords for each of your other keys.

There is much more to learn about building chords. Keep up the great work.

Demetri

Next, Blog #10: The Root 5 Power Chords



For information about private lessons and questions, please visit me at Demetri4.com.

Here is the YouTube link to the video that goes with this blog: http://bit.ly/3FF6Xli




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